Dermatologist Blog - Stone Oak Dermatology
By Stone Oak Dermatology
September 15, 2017
Category: Skin Condition
Tags: Varicose Veins  

Varicose VeinsMany people are bothered by the small, unsightly clusters of purple, red and blue veins that commonly appear on the legs. These blemishes are called spider and varicose veins. Factors that lead to the formation of these veins include heredity, gender, and pregnancy. Prolonged standing, obesity, hormones, and physical trauma may also contribute to the development of varicose veins.

In addition to the visual appearance of the veins, many people may experience the following symptoms:

  • Leg pain
  • Leg fatigue or heaviness
  • Burning sensations in the leg
  • Swelling/throbbing in the leg
  • Tenderness surrounding the veins

Varicose veins may remain merely a cosmetic issue or can progress to more serious health complications. Delaying treatment may cause leg discoloration, swelling and ulceration, or predispose to blood clots. It’s important to consult your regular physician when you first notice signs of varicose veins.  

For patients troubled by the appearance of their veins, there is help. Varicose veins can easily be removed with the help of a dermatologist. A time-tested treatment, sclerotherapy is a simple, safe, and effective non-surgical procedure used to treat unwanted varicose veins.  

Sclerotherapy diminishes the appearance of varicose veins by injecting a “sclerosing agent” into target veins to shrink the vessels and minimize their appearance. While a specific treatment plan can only be determined following a consultation with your dermatologist, most patients notice a significant reduction, if not total elimination, of their unwanted veins over the treatment period.

Sclerotherapy has been used for generations by dermatologists to help patients eliminate spider and varicose veins. Sclerotherapy can enhance your appearance and improve your self-confidence. Visit your dermatologist for an initial consultation and find out if you are a good candidate.

Dry SkinCold winds, low temperatures and dry indoor conditions can strip the skin of its natural oils that serve as a natural moisturizer. Although the cold winter months often cause dry skin, with proper skin care habits you can have a healthy complexion that lasts all season long.

You can’t control the harsh winter climate, but you can protect your skin by learning how to manage the factors that trigger dry, flaky skin.

How Can I Protect My Skin from Dryness

For starters, apply a heavy moisturizer or cream daily to help retain moisture and keep skin from drying out. Since strong, brisk winds can cause chapped skin, it is also important to cover exposed areas by wearing a hat, scarf or mittens when going out into the cold air.

Furnaces, radiators and fireplaces that you use to heat your home during cold winter months may feel wonderful in the middle of winter, but they can be extremely drying. To add moisture back into your home, try using a humidifier. Frequent showering and hand washing can also dry out your skin. Keep skin moist with lotion or cream immediately after you shower and wash your hands to seal in moisture.

No matter what season you’re in, if your dry skin becomes inflamed or develops a painful itch, visit our practice for a proper evaluation and treatment plan. A dermatologist can help you modify your current skin regimen accordingly to help your skin stay healthy with the changing seasons.

By Stone Oak Dermatology
August 28, 2017
Tags: Acne   Treatments   Blackheads   Whiteheads  

Acne is one of the most common skin conditions affecting teens and adults in the U.S. It can also be one of the most frustrating conditionsAcne, Treatments, Blackheads, Whiteheads to try treating on your own. A dermatologist can help by developing the right treatment plan for controlling your acne. Treatment can clear up existing acne and help prevent new acne from developing. At Stone Oak Dermatology in San Antonio, TX, Dr. Linda Banta treats acne and other skin conditions.

Causes of Acne

Acne can develop anywhere on the skin, but the face, chest, and back are especially prone to acne break outs. Acne develops when the pores become clogged with sebum. Normally, sebum helps clear out the pores by pushing debris and dead skin cells out. However, when the natural flow of sebum is interrupted for any reason, the pores can become clogged with dirt, debris, and dead skin cells. When this happens, acne is more likely to develop on the surface of the skin.

Acne Treatments

There are several different types of treatments available for clearing up existing acne and preventing future outbreaks. Your dermatologist in San Antonio can evaluate your skin and determine the most effective treatment plan for you. Treatments can be topical or oral. Topical treatments are applied externally on the surface of the skin. Oral treatments are ingested much like medication. In some cases, your dermatologist might develop a treatment protocol that includes both oral and topical treatments. Examples of acne treatments available through a dermatologist include:

  • Extraction of whiteheads and blackheads using a comedo instrument.
  • Topical application of benzoyl peroxide to minimize blockage of the pores.
  • Antibiotics, which can be taken orally or applied topically.
  • Topical application of tretinoin, a retinoid, for clearing up existing acne and preventing the formation of new acne.

No one wants to deal with acne outbreaks and struggling with chronic acne is especially frustrating. Your San Antonio, TX, dermatologist can develop an individualized treatment plan to clear up your existing acne and prevent additional flare ups. To schedule an appointment with Dr. Banta, call Stone Oak Dermatology at (210) 494-0504.

By Stone Oak Dermatology
August 15, 2017
Category: Skin Care

Skin TypeSkin care should be an important part of your daily hygiene. This should include cleansing the face daily, moisturizing, applying sunscreen and avoiding harsh products. A good skin care routine starts with understanding the unique needs of your skin type. In many cases, skin can be classified into four different categories: normal, dry, oily and combination.  

To determine your type of skin, try this simple test:

  • Wash your face and gently pat it dry.
  • Wait approximately 15 minutes and then press lens-cleaning tissue paper on different areas of your face.
  • If the paper sticks or picks up oil on all parts of your skin, then you have oily skin.
  • If the paper does not stick on any part of your face, then you have dry skin.
  • If the paper only sticks to your chin, nose and forehead, then you have normal or combination skin.

Normal Skin Types
The ideal skin type, normal skin is characterized by a smooth, even tone and usually blemish free.  It also tolerates most skin care lotions and creams. A regular skin care regimen combined with a balanced diet is often enough to maintain healthy, youthful skin.

Dry Skin Types
People with dry skin lack natural moisture. Dry skin may flake during the winter months, and chapping or cracking may occur when skin is extremely dry or dehydrated. Applying gentle moisturizer throughout the day and drinking plenty of water can help relieve dryness and also fight against premature aging. Avoid overexposure to the sun, harsh winds and smoking which can aggravate dry skin.

Oily Skin Types
If you have oily skin, you may be more prone to acne due to excessive oil secretions (sebum) on the face. Oily skin may appear greasy, and is commonly seen among adolescents due to hormonal changes which increase production of sebum. To manage oily skin, use cosmetics sparingly and only apply oil-free products when possible. Wash skin once or twice a day, avoid lotions and creams and always remove makeup before going to bed.

Combination Skin Types
Combination skin is a blend of both dry and oily skin, most often characterized by an oily T-zone (forehead, nose and chin) and a dry neck and cheeks.  Different parts of the face may require slightly different care. Applying a toner or anti-acne product on the T-zone to remove residual oils and impurities may be helpful in managing oily skin, while a mild moisturizer may be needed for the cheeks.

Having trouble determining your skin type? Visit your dermatologist for expert skin care advice and a personalized treatment plan for every type of skin. The state of our skin is affected by nutrition, general and emotional health, exercise and genes. How well you care for your skin will play an important role in achieving your healthy glow.

By Stone Oak Dermatology
August 01, 2017
Category: Nail Health
Tags: Nail Care  

NailsThe nails take a lot of abuse. From gardening and dishes to regular wear and tear, harsh chemicals and hard work can really take a toll on the condition of fingernails and toenails. Many nail problems can be avoided with proper care, but others may actually indicate a serious health condition that requires medical attention.  

According to the American Academy of Dermatology, nail problems comprise about 10 percent of all skin conditions, affecting a large number of older adults. Brittle nails are common nail problems, typically triggered by age and the environment. Other conditions include ingrown toenails, nail fungus, warts, cysts or psoriasis of the nails. All of these common ailments can be affectively treated with proper diagnosis from a dermatologist.

Mirror on Health

A person’s nails can reveal a lot about their overall health. While most nail problems aren’t severe, many serious health conditions can be detected by changes in the nails, including liver diseases, kidney diseases, heart conditions, lung diseases, diabetes and anemia. That’s why it’s important to visit your dermatologist if you notice any unusual changes in your nails.

Basic Nail Care

It’s easy to neglect your nails, but with basic nail care, you can help keep your fingernails and toenails looking and feeling great. Here’s how:

  • Keep nails clean and dry to prevent bacteria from building up under the nail.
  • Cut fingernails and toenails straight across to prevent ingrown nails and trauma.
  • Avoid tight-fitting footwear.
  • Apply an anti-fungal foot powder daily or when needed.
  • Avoid biting and picking fingernails, as infectious organisms can be transferred between the fingers and mouth.
  • Wear gloves to protect your fingernails when doing yard work or cleaning house to protect the nails from harsh chemicals and trauma.
  • When in doubt about self-treatment for nail problems, visit your dermatologist for proper diagnosis and care.

Always notify a dermatologist of nail irregularities, such as swelling, pain or change in shape or color of the nail. Remember, your nails can tell you a lot about your overall health, and a dermatologist can help determine the appropriate treatment for any of your nail problems.





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